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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
into a couple a few minutes ago that was here last year during irene, got engaged, then said we will come back for our honeymoon and got the word of sandy. now they have to go wack to new york. y you want it tato talk about fol trying to make the best of this situation. >> to prevent problems, the utility had 150 minemen on the street today and 440 contractors as well as 300 tree trimmers. they started running robo calls and requested 2500 additional linemen to work after the storm. >> the u.s. navy is on the move tonight getting his ships out of norfolk and out of sandy's path. the ships, including the aircraft carrier, uss harry truman are going out it sea until the area is clear it return. they are the world's largest naval installation. no cancellations at the airports yet but major airlines are offering passengers a way out. putting flexible travel policies in place so that passengers can change or cancel flights next week without paying a fee. >> a lot of people are doing whatever they can to get ready for sandy. flood sag real concern. so folks are arming themselves with sandbags and st
. for irene, i'll step out of the way. you can see irene, over 600,000 without power. of course, a lot of folks remember that. that was just a year ago with the derecho during one of our hottest times of the year and temperature over 100 degrees, we had a million people without power. that was the system that came in fast. and without of course, a lot of preparation. sandy, over 450,000 without power. so less of an impact in terms of power outages but a the downed trees throughout the area that had to be dealt with. such a large storm system that's having impact on the rest of the country. one that we will truly remember for quite a long time. 43 degrees is our current temperature with the south win at ten miles per hour. we're still feeling that moisture in the air. so as temperatures drop overnight, it will be a chilly start to the day tomorrow. in the 30s. 35, frederick. 38 in la plata. we'll have a lot more on sandy's aftermath coming up in a couple minutes. >> thanks. >>> the next big project when it comes to sandy is the clean-up. prince george's county bureau chief tracee wilkin
irene. keep in mind we are still high -- i lost track of what time it is but high tide is not until 7:30 and the wind keeps on increasing. the tide's coming n. we've got more and more rain so all this water is just going to get so much worse and especially when you think that we are only at the very, very beginning of this storm. we still have at least 36 hours to go here in rehoboth beach with hurricane sandy. and this has been going on since yesterday at around 4:00 in the afternoon. that's when we first started to really feel wow, that is probably the first big gust that i felt since we've been out here. we've been seeing really sustained winds that have been increasing throughout the night. but really within the last half- hour or so is when we first started to feel these huge gusts just coming in from the beach. we've got wave heights of about well over 20 feet now off the shore and it's just going to keep on getting worse. yesterday i talked with the governor of delaware. he was saying that already yesterday afternoon it was looking so much worse then that it was at the peak of
, this is an area in years past, hurricane irene, hurricane isabel, totally flooded over with storm surge. so there's certainly concern about that. throughout the day i've been talking to the mayor here at chesapeake beach, bruce wall. he tells me that the one thing that he's going to be looking at in the next couple of hours as we get into the morning hours is high tide. it's going to come up here about 4:00 in the morning. he expects the tide to be three feet higher than it normally is. so that's saying something for an area that, as i say, totally flooded over in years past. now, i guess the good news is not a lot of tourists out here. we didn't see a lot of them moving and shaking throughout the day. in fact, we're here right next to one of the main hotels. they tell me there's nobody in there almost. so that's a good thing, there's not a lot of tourists here. for the people who are here and for the people who live here, they know all about storm preps. we caught up with many of them this afternoon. take a look. >> reporter: these people know about hurricane preps. it's sandbags for sandy here
yesterday. it's important to have as many in place before the storm swept in. we learned that from irene. we have about 1300 dedicated men and women right now for the restoration. that does not include those working on secondary, such as myself, people working 24-7. customer service, outside and inside, we are working in preparation for a storm. >> power outages are such a sensitive subject in this area, especially after the derecho. how will the response be different this time? >> it will be different because it started with communication. we sent out automated calls last week. we told our customers that it would be a long duration event. we told our customers better would be the potential for extended period of power lost throughout the metro area. we told our customers last week that it was critical clabber preparation plant, and emergency preparedness plan for their family. and for businesses as well as residential parentso we have tried to be more transparent and communicate with our customers. that way people have an expectation of what to expect and can make plans accordingly. >> than
because the last time we had a big hurricane was irene and it was blown out of proportion as well. this one may be a little stronger but. >> irene i'll tell you what did a lot of damage in different places and the reality here -- thanks a lot, folks, the reality here is that a little bit of waiverring can make a huge, huge difference and you can see as time goes on, it can also make a big difference. you can come over and look at the patomic and rock creek is high and as that water comes down out of the mountains, there is serious potential for flooding. let's take it back to you. >>> bruce live in foggy bottom. found himself company, folks that tend to think the hurricane is over blown, fact is, if you look up the street in some of the neighbors and farther up the road in new york city, they will tell you this was not over blown and a complete disaster. >> thank you. we'll check in with topper but this thing is speeding up and making landfall there near atlantic city and then going inward toward philadelphia, toward new york city and causing terrible damage. we really did lu
's the number we're urging our residents to call. >> mr. gill, after irene and after the derecho, do you feel that you're better prepared, you know exactly what needs to happen for this storm? >> i believe the county is very much prepared to deal with what we are beginning -- [indiscernible] >> mr. gill, thank you very much. i do want to repeat ronald gill, jr. from the prince george's county 311 center says there is a shelter open. at 10:00 a.m. the richie coliseum will be open to shelter people on the campus of the university of maryland. again mr. gill, thank you and you be safe as well in this storm. >>> 9news team coverage of hurricane sandy continues with a look at things on the northeastern shore. kristin fisher is live along rehoboth beach in delaware with a look at conditions there. chris continue, we saw shots of the surf and it was really starting to kick up. >> reporter: definitely starting to kick up. you know this is not your normal hurricane when you are dressed in full ski gear to cover it. it is cold and getting colder. windy and getting so much windier. it is raining and it
hurricane irene, we achieved a 98% evacuation rate. but for whatever reason, this time, we haven't reached that number yet. we think we're somewhere having evacuated several thousand people. but we still have too many people in atlantic city. that creates a very uncomfortable situation for all of our emergency responders and officials are still trying to do the best we can to get people out of harm's way. >> mayor, ali velshi is on the streets of atlantic city. right now, the winds are obviously very gusty. ali, you have a question you'd like to ask the mayor. >> reporter: yes, i do, mayor. and the important thing is by looking at atlantic city, people can look at this and say, this might happen in my community. if you're still not evacuated, what do you do? i know people are driving around. they can get out in their car but it's gusty and dangerous. should people leave and go to a shelter now or hunker down and stay? >> at this point, i think they would be best served to stay at home and hunker down. i just visited a couple of our shelters. i had a very difficult time getting back to wher
. this storm looks to be very different than irene a year ago. irene was more of a direct hit in this area. this storm looks to be bringing just more rain, the winds, so people are paying a close eye on what happens with that. >> all right. thanks so much. keep us posted throughout the day. you saw the map there of the expected track. again it's not far off the coast of charleston, south carolina. going to make its way past the north carolina coast. let's check in with meteorologist alexandria steele. when we talk about 300 miles off the coast we can see it's enough to kick up the surf but those low-lying areas like a beautiful city like charleston, they don't have to worry about too much, do they? >> right. well you know, you talk about this. we are seeing a hurricane for sure. of course and we're going to see it along the coast like we normally would. we have our reporters along the coast like we do. but what makes this tropical storm so anom mow his, a, it's the hurricane now, so we have all that moisture, but it's also really going to morph into this powerful hybrid of a storm. the tro
in years. that sounds very dramatic, but it isn't so when you think about what irene did to connecticut last year. irene, many people in new york and new jersey rolled their eyes at it and said it wasn't a very big deal. here in connecticut it was a very big deal. here in fairfield there were houses with not just broken windows, houses knocked off foundation and thrown into the water. they expect this to be even worse, the storm surge to be even worse here than it was during irene. so that's the major concern. there's the mandatory evacuations up and down the connecticut coast. the good news is that most people are heeding those evacuation orders. the other big concern is power outages. all the wind they are expecting to get up here, because the wind is going to be very strong up on the northern edge of this storm. the wind will cause a lot of power outages along with that flooding. they expect -- connecticut light and power expect as many as 600,000 people to be without power here in connecticut for days on end. during irene they were without power for days on end as well so everybody
is the size of the loss? >> it is a major disaster in new jersey. you know i have gone through irene, october snowstorm, the blizzard of 2010. this is by par the worst thing we have gone through. we have 2.4 million people or households without power. we have over 200 state roads closed. we have -- wasn't actually a levee. it was a berm and the berm was overwhelmed by the tidal surge that came up the newark bay. same one affecting new york city. we are in the midst of rescuing hundreds of people in bergen county from their homes. also involved in rescues last night, middlesex county rescuing people from their homes. again, not with river flooding but tidal surge from the bay. so this is -- not even to mention what's happen order the jersey coastline which i think in the long run will be the part of the state that's the most devastated. you saw some of the scenes yesterday from up and down our coast. new jersey obviously this is where it came onshore. i think the state of new jersey took it in the neck worse than any other state. it is going to take as you while to dig o
, then look what happens here, kind of just rotates and spins and that's the scary aspect. remember, irene in vermont all that flooding. sandy is rotating and spinning for 24 hours dumping an inch of rain an hour. so, this is the potential for devastating and deadly flooding. couple that with, of course, this wind field 70-mile-per-hour winds extending 450 miles out and the potent energy with this bringing snow potentially to the mountains on the western side of it. so, guys, this -- computer models have been for 25 years and they have never had to run this exact scenario. so, a lot of very intriguing, but scary things about it. >> alexandria, thanks. >>> a storm of this size can cause a nightmare, not just in terms of -- they are asking people to come in from out of state to help the power company. also opening a staging area at baltimore's airport to prepare for the storm's arrival. >>> 300 national guardsmen can be put on recovery. >>> the storm is already having an impact on the presidential campaigns, especially in some key swing states. both vice president biden and mitt romney cance
during hurricane irene, so they knew what to do. they knew exactly when to leave. they got there immediately once they were advised to leave. so we're really proud of these folks in the shelter and, you know, they just seem to be having a good time. they are in a safe place. they've got warm meals and they've got the support of the american red cross to get them through these hard times, because when they go home, they don't know what they're going to expect. they could go home to severe flooding and severe damage to their homes so having that safety net right now is so important. >> well, besides the shelters which obviously are critically important and could continue to be so because as you say of flooding and we're hearing that some of these power outages could be long term, what are the priorities of the services that the red cross will provide in the next couple of days? >> yes, we've already gone ahead and told them and pre-positioned over 100 emergency response vehicles and thousands of relief supplies, cots, blanket, food and deployed odd thousand of volunteers so o
numbers come in and basically in relation to storms like hugo, katrina, irene, you're like, uh-oh. >> gives you an idea how strong it is. wall of water that came up the new jersey coastline and to new york. big push. happier note, and trick or treaters, happy halloween. >> if you're wearing a costume, do you need a coat over it? >> i don't think, but a couple of layers underneath the costume. not bitter cold here. i can remember halloweens past when i was a kid and one or two where it was cold. >> and the rain. that's the worst. >> yeah. the rain and the 40s. so the good news is, we're just -- chilly. i couldn't get it out. >> a creepy chill. >> i was going to use a creepy voice, but it didn't happen. upper 40s for the kids trick or treating. should be dry. that's the best part of the forecast here, as things are gradually improving. doesn't mean we don't have a few rain showers at the moment. we're not quite down with the rain, particularly north and west, towards hagerstown. persistent batch to the south and west, towards culpeper as well. parts of the area not done with the
the outer banks, they're worried that could be washed out, parts of it, as happened back with irene. people are paying close attention to the radar, watching the track of the storm. just to see how it affects this area. >> but clearly, george, the streets are pretty dezrted around there, are they not? a lot of vacation homes, as you mentioned, some folks who are living there kind of part time. of those who have decided to kind of wait out the storm, are you hearing very much from them? >> they're seeking higher ground. they're not leaving the island. some people have left, but a lot of people are staying to ride the storm out, going to hotels, going to areas around the outer banks here where they know it's higher ground. they also know the spots that flood. and that's what they're keeping an eye on. >> thanks so much, george. we'll check back with you momentarily. meantime, let's head north now. virginia is one of the places that is also concerned about what the storm could bring. athena jones is in a really beautiful part of virginia, northern virginia now, old town alexandria where it loo
of packing long johns and ear mu muffs. it is freezing out here. i want you to take a look. irene was easy. bring on sandy. minimal damage on rehoboth avenue and even along the boardwalk. you're seeing some debris, sandbags here. honestly, this town, this city was expecting a whole lot worse. i think a lot of people were. a lot of people waking up this morning very, very thankful for the things that have gone on in the course of the last 24 hours, at least here for us locally. new york, new jersey, a very different story. more than eight inches of rain here in rehoboth. more than 6,000 power outages and still a driving ban in effect. but this morning, again, with that driving ban, businesses as well are not going to be open until after the 4:30 hour. still a very cold, very light drizzly morning here in rehoboth. how are you holding up? >> we're fine. especially compared to you. you guys have been working overtime in in rehoboth. thakds to you guys on team rehoboth. we'll see you in a bit. >>> the wind may be dying down, but hundreds of thousands of people in our area still in the dark. mo
as to when the lights will come back on. >> during hurricane irene full restoration took eight days. for hurricane sandy full restoration may take longer. >> reporter: new jersey governor chris christie took a 4 1/2 hour long helicopter tour of devastated areas in his state. he's thanking volunteers and first responders and comforting those who have lost everything. >> very difficult time. very difficult day. so we just start. we survived. >> reporter: new jersey is not the only state recovering today. new york governor andrew cuomo was also touring damage in manhattan where underground tunnels and subway stations are full of corrosive seawater. even still officials are saying the worst is behind them. >> it's the beginning of a process that we all know will take a while, but this is the end of the down side and hopefully from here is going up. >> reporter: as the storm now moves towards canada, an air travel tracking website says more than 18,000 flights have been canceled due to the storm. in absecon, new jersey, craig boswell, fox news. >>> ocean city took a beating. guess we'
here during hurricane irene. hurricane sandy is coming on strong. here's what he had to say yesterday around 4:00 in the afternoon. take a listen. >> i haven't seen a whole lot worse than this and the storm is already hundreds of miles -- it's still hundreds of miles away. so what it will be when it actually hits is very concerning. that's why we're asking people to treat this really seriously. >> reporter: it looks like a lot of people out here in rehoboth beach are taking this seriously, although we still have seen a lot of folks out here deciding to ride out the storm. you are seeing the 14-foot, 15- foot tall waves crashing into the rehoboth beach boardwalk. all the businesses right along the beach have all boarded up. they are all closed down and they're going to stay this way for several more days. lots of sandbags, lots of boarded up, taped windows. really a ghost town over there. you can see the waves just creeping closer and closer to the shore. we are still three hours away from high tide. farther down in ocean city, i believe their boardwalk is still standing. social media
thanks to hurricane irene last year. >> we actually got engaged here last year and the storm came in and we had to leave early and now we're here. we got married, on our honeymoon. and the storm came in again. >> so far no evacuation orders have been issued for the town. >> isn't it good luck though to rain on your wedding day? if you can find the silver lining and try to tie that in. >> we'll check back in with them in a couple years. see how they're doing. >>> coming up on news 4 today a holiday hallmark. a rush to give the national christmas tree its debut before sandy steals the show. >>> protecting your property from flooding. liz crenshaw shares some do it yourself projects you can do now before the storm. >>> remember, storm team 4 is tracking the hurricane sandy on air and online. sign up for breaking news alerts on nbc washington.com. also follow us on facebook and >>> take a look at sandy. the system is now a tropical storm but still has the potential to regain its hurricane status as it inches up the east coast and of course everyone around here and all across the easte
storms recently, like hurricane irene last year and you run the into sentiments like this. irene was easy, bring on sandy. and forget the reign and tidal surge for a moment, it is know that is already hitting west virginia. blizzard conditions expected. and as far west as chicago, emergency planners are bracing for their own challenges. >> lake winds are going to be 50 to 60 miles an hour. waves could exceed the 24-foot mark. >> now, people may start returning home in some of these areas. as early as today. but there is still a long cleanup ahead. in rehobeth beach, delaware, doug luzader, fox news. >>> after the break, dave roth takes a look at how the aftermath of sandy is playing out on the web. >> but first, a reminder that refrigerated food can spoil quickly during a power outage. keep items in the fridge as cool as possible the cdc suggests packing together dairy items, meat, fish and eggs in a cooler with ice and use a food thermometer to check food in a dark refrigerator and anything more than 40 degrees fahrenheit should be tossed. for the freezer section, a half full freezer wil
they know the drill. thanks to hurricane irene last year. >> w actually got engaged here last year. and the storm came in last year. we had to leave early. now we're here. we got married on our honeymoon. and the storm came in again. >> some luck. so far no evacuation orders have been issued for the town. our own erika gonzalez is in rehoboth and caught up with the "today" show's al roker who says sandy is a storm we'll be talking about for a while. >> you have to be prepared for a lot of rain and you have to be prepared for a lot of wind. i think you got to be prepared for a storm surge and if you're not along the coast don't think you're out of the woods either because, you know, the parts of inland maryland, virginia, pennsylvania, all going to see effects from this. so i think this is a storm that could be really one we'll be talking about for years to come. >> next the arrangements you may want to make now. >> we'll also take your questions on facebook and twitter. send them to us right now. use the hash tag sandy d.c. we'll try to get to as many as possible. >> storm team 4 i
hurricane irene it wasn't so bad here. certainly this storm is a new category. when it comes to cleaning up here, it will take a long time. >> jennifer davis, thanks very much. >>> it's hard to even understand that kind of devastation when you see it. it's like -- jenny is right, a bar of soap sitting there. >> i've been to devastation like that, and tv doesn't really -- we look at it and go, that's terrible, it doesn't really capture it. >> right. >> it's extraordinary. >> certainly can't capture the human pain associated with it. >> right. >> yep. it's been tough. going to continue to be so, i'm afraid. >> you hate to say we dodged a bullet, you don't feel comfortable saying that when people are hurting so bad. what's going on today? >> right. i want to do trick or treat. turn the corner into something more fun. >> we need to know. >> here we go. the good news is, i think we'll be dry. not a lot of wind. fine conditions. a little cool, and a creepy chill. [ creepy laugh by tony ] >> tony, that was pretty good. or was that you, allison? upper 40s as trick or treaters head out to take care
expected to hit here but to hit here hard. we look at the video from where irene hit this area last year. you can see that the sand mounds and the seawalls that are intended to be the front line for defense for the storm, they were no match for the heavy rains and winds. water just poured right in. as a result, there was massive flooding, mandatory evacuations. and people in this area, bracing, preparing themselves for the worst. sam? >> thank you, linsey. thank you, ginger. if you've seen the spaghetti models, they're turning this thing towards the coastline. a lot of terms are out there. joking terms like frankenstorm are used. we turn to bernie rayno from accuweather. when you look at hear the terms, how much of it is hype on this storm? and how much is very real? >> when you've been in this field as long as you and i have been, sam, you look for a way out when you see a storm that's projected to be this strong. but unfortunately, i don't believe there is a way out. this is not being overhyped. i would use the terms devastating and historic. a 1 in 30-year storm. or even in the fact o
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)